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The Stay-at-Home Dad Revolution: How dads are changing the face of parenting

The Stay-at-Home Dad Revolution: How dads are changing the face of parenting

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  • Armin Brott, Dad, Author & Radio Host  | Transcript:If you are a stay-at-home dad or thinking about becoming one at any point, it's going to be a bit of a life changer.  

Part of the reasons is that there is practically no support out there for stay-at-home dads.  There's a ton of support for stay-at-home moms.  When I was a stay-at-home dad, one of the things that would just annoy the heck out of me is that I would be out walking the kids in the middle of the day, and someone would say,
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    Dad, Author & Radio Host
    If you are a stay-at-home dad or thinking about becoming one at any point, it's going to be a bit of a life changer. Part of the reasons is that there is practically no support out there for stay-at-home dads. There's a ton of support for stay-at-home moms. When I was a stay-at-home dad, one of the things that would just annoy the heck out of me is that I would be out walking the kids in the middle of the day, and someone would say, "Oh are you babysitting?" I'd say, "No, I'm not babysitting. I'm taking care of my children." Or I'm taking my children clothes shopping and someone would say, "Where's there mother?" "I don't know where their mother is, does it matter? I'm here to buy clothes. You want my money or you don't want my money?" So you have to be prepared for things like that. People don't get it. They will say, "Oh, I hope you find a job some time soon." You have a job. This is the job I'm doing. Look for opportunities where you can get support. One of the greatest opportunities is other dads. The problem is how to find them. There are not that many stay-at-home dads. As you are at a park, if you see a guy sitting in the corner, far from the group of women on the other side, that's probably a stay-at-home dad. Go talk to him. The problem is that we don't like go to congregate in that way, but if you eavesdrop on the women, they are finding out all sorts of fantastic deals on diapers, or who is the best babysitter, or where are some fantastic activities. We're missing out on all that. You may think you are a new dad and not know all that much stuff. You know stuff and can help other people. They know stuff that can help you. So connect with other dads. There are websites if you look on Google for "at home dad" you will find websites of where there are playgroups of other stay-at-home dads. Make those connections.

    Armin Brott

    Dad, Author & Radio Host

    A former Marine, Armin Brott has devoted the last 15 years to providing men with the tools, support, and knowledge to help them become the fathers they want to be—and their families need them to be. His seven critically acclaimed books for fathers have sold well over a million copies. Titles include The Expectant Father: Facts, Tips, and Advice for Dads-to-Be and The New Father: A Dad’s Guide to the First Year. He has written on fatherhood for hundreds of newspapers and magazines and is a frequent guest on such television programs as the Today Show. He also writes a nationally syndicated newspaper column (Ask Mr. Dad), and hosts a syndicated radio show (Positive Parenting). He lives with his family in Oakland, California.

    More Parenting Videos from Armin Brott >
  • Scott Lenz, Stay-at-Home Dad  | Transcript:There are many things I do to debunk myths and stereotypes about being a stay-at-home dad, but the primary one is to be competent, is to just do your job as a parent, is to raise a healthy, happy, aware, smart children. And then you can break it down into subsets of being a really good cook, you can be fashion savvy, you can be tech savvy, you can volunteer for the PTA, you can become a room parent – and I do all of those things. So I think that I’m happy in the progress I’ve made to show that dads can be just as competent as stay-at-home parents as moms can.
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    Stay-at-Home Dad
    There are many things I do to debunk myths and stereotypes about being a stay-at-home dad, but the primary one is to be competent, is to just do your job as a parent, is to raise a healthy, happy, aware, smart children. And then you can break it down into subsets of being a really good cook, you can be fashion savvy, you can be tech savvy, you can volunteer for the PTA, you can become a room parent – and I do all of those things. So I think that I’m happy in the progress I’ve made to show that dads can be just as competent as stay-at-home parents as moms can.

    Scott Lenz

    Stay-at-Home Dad

    Scott Lenz was born in Lewisberg, Pennsylvania. By the time he reached 9th grade, he had been to eight schools, which explains a lot about his social awkwardness. However, his wife Suzanne and two kids - Jaron, 13 and Georgia, 10 - went to less than five schools combined, so it all evens out.

    He was the original rat mascot for Chuck E. Cheese, and since then has been a record store manager, music journalist, television documentarian and, most recently and importantly, a stay-at-home dad. His single greatest hope is that ABBA will one day reunite.

    More Parenting Videos from Scott Lenz >
  • Adrian  Kulp, Author & Blogger of Dad or Alive  | Transcript:What are my top tips to surviving an entire day with my kids? You know I think there are 2 things that help me a lot; structure and organization. With my wife being on 10 to 12 hours a day it seems really daunting upfront but when it really comes down to it, it is 3 meals, it is 2 to 3 activity, a nap time, and she is home. What I try to do is in the morning, i try to do something completely based around them. I will take them  to a playground or go for a  walk and in the afternoon If I need to get something done from me or  family says it is grocery shopping I really try and include them in what we are doing  let them pick the fruits, let them pick the vegetables, make them feel involved and all avoid any kind of tantrums or breakdowns. Organization, knowing that everything has its place  and knowing where everything is that I need at the time helps me a ton.
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    Author & Blogger of Dad or Alive
    What are my top tips to surviving an entire day with my kids? You know I think there are 2 things that help me a lot; structure and organization. With my wife being on 10 to 12 hours a day it seems really daunting upfront but when it really comes down to it, it is 3 meals, it is 2 to 3 activity, a nap time, and she is home. What I try to do is in the morning, i try to do something completely based around them. I will take them to a playground or go for a walk and in the afternoon If I need to get something done from me or family says it is grocery shopping I really try and include them in what we are doing let them pick the fruits, let them pick the vegetables, make them feel involved and all avoid any kind of tantrums or breakdowns. Organization, knowing that everything has its place and knowing where everything is that I need at the time helps me a ton.

    Adrian Kulp

    Author & Blogger of Dad or Alive

    Adrian Kulp is a stay at home dad for two toddlers, Ava and Charlie.  His popular blog, ‘Dad or Alive’ helped him procure a deal at Penguin Publishing, titled Dad or Alive: Confessions of an Unexpected Stay-at-home Dad.  He also writes for The Huffington Post and is preparing a comedic lecture based on his transition into fatherhood. Adrian is a former TV executive both for Adam Sandler’s Happy Madison and Chelsea Handler’s Borderline Amazing Productions, as well as the comic booker for ‘The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson’ on CBS.

    More Parenting Videos from Adrian Kulp >
  • Mike Spohr, Blogger & Dad  | Transcript:I think there's definitely a lot of advantages for a dad being really involved in his child's life, for the dad and for the child. For the dad, you get to be there with your child and experience the great thing of watching them grow up and become the little person that they become. That's incredible, and you learn a lot of lessons that men are not really taught in the rest of their lives, so that's incredibly valuable. And then for the child, it's great for the kid too. I think growing up to see a man in a different role than maybe society kind of inundates them with, that's really valuable to have a more open-minded perspective on what a man can be. And also just being around your dad, I know personally at one point, my father worked overseas for two years. Those were the two hardest years of my life growing up. So, when you have a dad around to guide you and kind of support you, I think that's great for a child and really helps their development as much as possible.
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    Blogger & Dad
    I think there's definitely a lot of advantages for a dad being really involved in his child's life, for the dad and for the child. For the dad, you get to be there with your child and experience the great thing of watching them grow up and become the little person that they become. That's incredible, and you learn a lot of lessons that men are not really taught in the rest of their lives, so that's incredibly valuable. And then for the child, it's great for the kid too. I think growing up to see a man in a different role than maybe society kind of inundates them with, that's really valuable to have a more open-minded perspective on what a man can be. And also just being around your dad, I know personally at one point, my father worked overseas for two years. Those were the two hardest years of my life growing up. So, when you have a dad around to guide you and kind of support you, I think that's great for a child and really helps their development as much as possible.

    Mike Spohr

    Blogger & Dad

    Author of the parenting blog "The Newborn Identity", Mike Spohr lives in Southern California with his wife, Heather, ice cream-obsessed two-year-old daughter, Annabel, and froufrou dog, Rigby. He is also the Executive Director of Friends of Maddie, a charity started in honor of his late daughter Madeline, which helps the families of NICU babies.

    More Parenting Videos from Mike Spohr >