Getting kids to play by themselves

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Getting kids to play by themselves

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My golden nugget parenting advise is to pay attention to your children while they're being good. If you wait until they're nagging or screaming or tantruming and then you have to intervene, you're going to end up increasing those negative behaviours. If you're a student or a working parent like I am and you just must absolutely have an hour or two to yourself, set up a child's obstacle course of activities. You need to divide the time that you need to yourself into 10 to 15 minute increments and set them on an activity that might take just that long. Then come in, swoop in to give them attention just at that time, about 10 to 15 minutes and they'll probably stay engaged much longer than if they were to get bored of the activity and come to seek out your attention. So you can keep them going, and going on this round of activities just by giving them attention incrementally.

Learn about: Getting kids to play by themselves from Nicole Hill, MA,...

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Nicole Hill, MA

Behaviorist & Swim Instructor

Nicole Hill, Director of Autism Services and CEO of Brightwork ABA Therapy is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA).  Nicole has been working in the field of ABA since 2005.  She has a Master of Arts in Applied Behavior Analysis, a BA in Speech Communication, and a minor in Spanish.

Nicole has a broad range of experience stemming from working with children from birth through high school in a variety of capacities for over 15 years.  Nicole specializes in working with young children on the autism spectrum and their families, with particular focus on  early intervention including FBA’s, BIP’s, verbal behavior, DTT, natural environment teaching, play skills, social skills, and parent training. 

Nicole originally began her work with special needs children in 1998 as a swim instructor for children who found learning to swim especially challenging.  With this experience, Nicole founded SwimFit Babies & Kids (swimfit.org), a program that uses techniques founded in ABA to teach swim techniques. 

She is an active member of Applied Behavior Analysis, International (ABAI) as well as California Association for Applied Behavior Analysis (CalABA).

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