Using basal body temperature to predict ovulation

Fertility Specialist Hal Danzer, MD, explains how basal body temperature can be used to predict ovulation and how to accurately check basal body temperature
How To Use Basal Body Temperature To Predict Ovulation
KidsInTheHouse the Ultimate Parenting Resource
Kids in the House Tour

Using basal body temperature to predict ovulation

Comment
2
Like
2
Transcription: 
Basal body temperature, it's been around for years. I actually helped co-author a book about basal body temperatures in conjunction with natural family planning. The woman takes her temperature right when she wakes up in the morning, with a special thermometer that reads between 97 and 99, because you have to read small degrees of change. So the body temperature is in the high 97s. Then after ovulation, it moves up and stays above 98 for the two weeks until a woman starts her period. The problem is that after a woman ovulates, it's too late to try. Today we are using ovulation predictor kits which the test strip turns positive before you ovulate, so you can have sex on the right days. Basal temperature has been around for years. It's good in some ways, but it's been replaced by ovulation predictor kits, which are really accurate.

Fertility Specialist Hal Danzer, MD, explains how basal body temperature can be used to predict ovulation and how to accurately check basal body temperature

Transcript

Expert Bio

More from Expert

Hal Danzer, MD

Fertility Specialist

Co-founder and partner of the Southern California Reproductive Center, Dr. Hal C. Danzer, MD is an expert in reproductive medicine, including reproductive endocrinology, women’s health and fertility issues.  As one of the most respected specialists in the Los Angeles area, over the years Dr. Danzer has helped countless patients fulfill their dreams of becoming parents. 

Dr. Danzer, a reproductive endocrinologist, is board-certified in obstetrics and gynecology, and serves on the faculty of the UCLA Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Fellowship Program.  He is also Assistant Clinical Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.

Among his hospital appointments, Dr. Danzer served as Reproductive Endocrinologist at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, as well as Attending Physician in the Cedars-Sinai Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

More Parenting Videos from Hal Danzer, MD >
Enter your email to
download & subscribe
to our newsletter