You Won't Believe How A Toddler Tantrum Helps Prevent MORE Toddler Tantrums

Toddler tantrums have their benefits. Your parenting style should welcome them -- well, at least a little. Your child's tears in a tantrum release cortisol, the stress hormone. Too much stress is actually harmful to their bodies. Plus learning to react to stress is a vital part of child development .
Parenting Styles | Toddler Tantrums | Toddler Tantrums Have Their Benefits
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You Won't Believe How A Toddler Tantrum Helps Prevent MORE Toddler Tantrums

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Tantrums are not only good for children. They are really good for all of us. When we are in the throws of a tantrum, we are feeling a sense of powerlessness and fear that has gotten stuck in our limbic system, are mid-brain, if you think of the hand as the middle of the brain. Having a good cry can actually release those feelings. We look at that behavior and think that our children are just pushing our buttons or provoking us, but they are really just communicating the best they can that they are feeling cranky or off balance. Human beings cry for two reasons. We cry for communication, but also our tears release cortisol, the stress hormone; which if it stays in the body, it damages our internal organs and damages our brain tissue. When our children are exhibiting that off-track behavior, if we move in and set a limit and allow them to tantrum, they are actually releasing that cortisol, getting those feelings out of them, having a good cry. They experience the release in returning to their natural state of joy. We get the opportunity, when we stay there with empathy and compassion, to deepen our connection.

Toddler tantrums have their benefits. Your parenting style should welcome them -- well, at least a little. Your child's tears in a tantrum release cortisol, the stress hormone. Too much stress is actually harmful to their bodies. Plus learning to react to stress is a vital part of child development.

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Kathy Gordon

Parent Educator

Kathy Gordon is the single adoptive mother of a very spirited nine year-old boy, but was not prepared for the challenges of parenting a child whose brain was developed under stress. When her son was three, Kathy had the good fortune of taking parenting classes with Ruth Beaglehole, founding Director of the Center for Nonviolent Education and Parenting, (theechocenter.org), and she realized this powerful compassionate method of working with children was something she wanted to teach. She has been a teacher, director and coach most of her adult life. Kathy was certified as a Parent Educator through the Center for Nonviolent Education and Parenting in May of 2008, and will now continue her training by becoming a Certified Hand-in-Hand Parenting Parent Educator. Kathy works with families individually, teaches parenting classes and facilitates trainings for educators and schools communities. Her practice is called Unconditional Connection because we all long for connection, and we long to be unconditionally loved. We live in a society in which we are continually judged by our behavior. Kathy offers research-based information and tools to help people look underneath and beyond the behavior, so that we may be more unconditionally connected thus creating a world of cooperation and peace. 

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