How undiagnosed reading problems can affect learning

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How undiagnosed reading problems can affect learning

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Some children are not diagnosed until a later grade, maybe fourth or fifth grade, because they've been able to successfully compensate for their reading difficulties up until then. And therefore, parents and teachers may not even notice that they're having difficulties reading. So some particularly bright children may pull in clues from other things – if there's pictures or even from the very words that they can read – they can infer enough meaning that people think that they are actually reading all of the information. Another way that children can compensate is with strong memory. For example, some children are able to memorize certain single words that is enough to get them though the assignments that they need to do. What ends up happening is as they get older and demands increase, then they aren't able to compensate so well. And they have more difficulty, they start to struggle more in school and that's when it becomes diagnosed.

Watch Video: How undiagnosed reading problems can affect learning by Sandra K. Loo, PhD, ...

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Sandra K. Loo, PhD

Pediatric Neuropsychologist

Dr. Sandra Loo is Director of Pediatric Neuropsychology and Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the David Geffen School of Medicine. Dr. Loo is a child clinical psychologist and works clinically in the Medical Psychology Assessment Center and UCLA ADHD Clinics. She specializes in neuropsychological assessment of childhood psychiatric disorders such as ADHD and Dyslexia. Before coming to UCLA, Dr. Loo was director of two outpatient clinics specializing in the diagnostic and neurocognitive assessment of attention and learning disorders at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and the University of Massachusetts where she worked with Dr. Russell Barkley.

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