Curbing teen night driving by giving the car a curfew

Director of the UCLA Parenting & Children’s Friendship Program, Cynthia G. Whitham, LCSW, explains what she did with her teenage daughter at the time to minimize any risk of an accident late at night. By "giving the car a curfew" she was able to ensure that her daughter would be home safely or with a responsible driver at night.
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Curbing teen night driving by giving the car a curfew

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When my daughter turned 16, I was getting nervous. Found out that most accident happen, happens between 12 and 3 am so I had to come up with the plan, My daughter had not a had curfew. She did not need a curfew. She went to an all girl school. She was not getting much trouble. She was actually an excellent student and most of the time when she was out she was doing school activities. So how do I came up with a curfew. So we said to her" Miranda, you know you did not have a curfew. You are very mature and cooperative but the car has a curfew. The car needs to be home by midnight and she look at me and I could she was wondering are you going to imposed something infantilizing on me or may be she thought that I was accusing her of not being responsible but I just repeated , it is the car that has the curfew. She went along with it. She came home before midnight. If she needed to be out later she went with experience drivers to guide her and got her off the road before the party has got to.

Director of the UCLA Parenting & Children’s Friendship Program, Cynthia G. Whitham, LCSW, explains what she did with her teenage daughter at the time to minimize any risk of an accident late at night. By "giving the car a curfew" she was able to ensure that her daughter would be home safely or with a responsible driver at night.

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Cynthia G. Whitham, LCSW

Director, UCLA Parenting & Children’s Friendship Program

Cynthia G. Whitham, LCSW, Director of the UCLA Parenting and Children’s Friendship Program, has been training parents for over 30 years. She is the author of two books, Win the Whining War & Other Skirmishes: A family peace plan, and The Answer is NO: Saying it & sticking to it, which have been translated into nine languages. In addition to her UCLA group classes, Ms. Whitham has a private practice on the east and west sides of Los Angeles. In 2000, she spent a month training clinicians at the National Institute of Mental Health of Japan. A lively speaker, Ms. Whitham does presentations and trainings for schools and organizations. Ms. Whitham raised two happy, healthy, and (relatively) well-behaved children (she thinks that may be the best credential of all). Daughter Miranda McLeod is a fiction author and is in a PhD program at Rutgers University. With sadness, Cynthia tells us that her son Kyle died in 2007, within months of graduating from San Francisco State University.

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