CPR for drowning victims

Richard Pass, RN, Registered Nurse & CPR expert, shares advice on how to perform CPR for a drowning victim and how to tell if a drowning victim is revivable
Pediatric First Aid - Performing CPR For Drowning Victims
KidsInTheHouse the Ultimate Parenting Resource
Kids in the House Tour

CPR for drowning victims

Comment
945
Like
945
Transcription: 
Well, first of all, keep in mind that drowning is the second leading cause of accidental death in the pediatric population. Drowning victims are revivable if several things happen: 1. That they’re not under water too long. 2. But two, that CPR be started immediately upon pulling them out. It turns out that CPR for the drowning victims is essentially the same as it is for people on dry land. The difference being is that this is again the attempt to revive someone. It is not about water extraction from the victim. Water tends to go mostly into the stomach in a drowning victim rather than the lungs. What water gets in the lungs generally gets absorbed into the body. What water gets in the stomach usually gets vomited out. So one of the biggest concerns we have as we are doing our 30 pumps and 2 breaths is that spontaneous vomiting on the part of the victim may occur. And if that does occur, stop the pumping, roll the victim on their side, assist with moving that material out of their mouth. If they remain lifeless, get them back on their back and continue CPR. This victim again is a revivable one and in most cases those that do well are already spontaneously breathing and possibly even conscious by the time the paramedics even get to you.

Richard Pass, RN, Registered Nurse & CPR expert, shares advice on how to perform CPR for a drowning victim and how to tell if a drowning victim is revivable

Transcript

Expert Bio

More from Expert

Richard Pass, RN

Registered Nurse & CPR Expert

Richard Pass, RN, BS, was born in Los Angeles. He studied nursing in Portland, Oregon and has since practiced nursing for 35 years, including ICU, Emergency, and Cardiology nursing. Richard started his CPR & Family Safety educational company, Save a Little Life, Inc., in 1999. With Save a Little Life, Inc., Richard presents house calls and classes all over the Los Angeles area. He teaches medical-surgical nursing at California State University, and is married with two grown children and one grandchild.

Choking & CPR, Poisons, Poisons, Poison
More Parenting Videos from Richard Pass, RN >
Enter your email to
download & subscribe
to our newsletter