Young brains vs. grown-up brains

Childhood Development Specialist Marcy Axness, PhD, explains how understanding the differences between children's and adult's brains can help to promote brain development in children
The Differences Between Children's and Adult's Brains
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Young brains vs. grown-up brains

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The young child, up until around age seven, has a whole different brain landscape. It runs at a slower speed. Their brainwaves actually resemble our brainwaves when we're dreaming or when we're just waking up. So that is the hallmark of childhood or should be. The child should be allowed to live in this dreamy, kind of, imaginative space where they can just go through the day without having to think too much and be so aware. In our culture today, we lay a bunch of facts on them and we're over-intellectualizing things all the time and we're asking them things and giving them tons of choices. We're explaining and justifying and it really pulls them out of that dream space. It really, kind of, pisses them off. They don't realize it and they get cranky. Once we understand how a young child is supposed to be able to live and create and environment where they can be, sort of, not thinking too much. We are going to promote that growth consciousness that's going to foster optimal social brain development.

Childhood Development Specialist Marcy Axness, PhD, explains how understanding the differences between children's and adult's brains can help to promote brain development in children

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Marcy Axness, PhD

Childhood Development Specialist

Marcy Axness, PhD, is an early development specialist, popular international speaker, and author of Parenting for Peace: Raising the Next Generation of Peacemakers. She is a top blogger at Mothering.com and a member of their expert panel. Featured in several documentary films as an expert in adoption, prenatal development and Waldorf education, Dr. Axness has a private practice coaching parents-in-progress. She considers as one of her most important credentials that she raised two peacemakers to share with the world -- Ian and Eve, both in their 20s. 

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